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Logo for QCon Conferences 14th Edition of QCon London Conference for Professional Software Developers

2nd to 6th March 2020

London, United Kingdom

Part of the QCon Conferences series

14th Edition of QCon London Conference for Professional Software Developers Sessions

  1. Main Room

    Session image for Streaming a Million likes/second: Real-time interactions on Live Video by Sr. Staff Software Engineer @LinkedIn Akhilesh Gupta

    Streaming a Million likes/second: Real-time interactions on Live Video by Sr. Staff Software Engineer @LinkedIn Akhilesh Gupta

    Topics I will cover include: - Server-side and client-side frameworks for persistent connections. - Managing persistent connections with millions of active clients. - Pub/Sub architecture for real-time streaming with less than 100ms end to end latency to millions of connected clients. Hint: No Kafka! - Leveraging the same platform for other dynamic experiences like Presence.

    When a broadcaster like BBC streams a live video on LinkedIn, tens of thousands of viewers will watch it concurrently. Typically, hundreds of likes on the video will be streamed in real-time to all of these viewers. That amounts to a million likes/second streamed to viewers per live video. How do we make this massive real-time interaction possible across the globe? In this talk, I’ll do a technical deep-dive into how we use the Play/Akka Framework and a scalable distributed system to enable live interactions like likes/comments at massive scale at extremely low costs across multiple data centers.

  2. Main Room

    Session image for Monolith Decomposition Patterns by Microservice, Cloud, CI/CD Expert Sam Newman

    Monolith Decomposition Patterns by Microservice, Cloud, CI/CD Expert Sam Newman

    I’ll also cover off patterns that can work to migrate functionality out of systems you can’t change, which are useful when working with very old systems or vendor products. We'll look at the use of strangler patterns, change data capture, database decomposition and more.

    Patterns to help you incrementally migrate from a monolith to microservices. Big Bang rebuilds of systems are so 20th century. With our users expecting new functionality to be shipped more frequently than ever before, we no longer have the luxury of a complete system rebuild. In fact, a big bang migration of a monolithic architecture into a microservice architecture can be especially problematic, as we’ll explore in this talk. We want to ship features, but we also want to improve our architecture, and for many of us this means breaking down existing systems into microservices. But how do you do this while still regularly releasing new features? In this talk, I’ll share with you some key principles and a number of patterns which you can use to incrementally decompose an existing system into microservices.